8 records – page 1 of 1.

0 recommendations   18 downloads

Cannabis and the need for dialogue

Resource Type
Lesson Plan
Grade Level
8
9
Submitted By
Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research - 3 months ago
Description
Recent policy changes relative to cannabis are cr…
Resource Type
Lesson Plan
Grade Level
8
9
Submitted By
Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research - 3 months ago
Description
Recent policy changes relative to cannabis are creating debates in Canadian society. When addressing complex issues like drug use, people often find it difficult to have productive conversations. Dialogue provides a different approach. Dialogue is a manner of communication that involves two-way conversations where people not only speak to each other but also really listen. The goal is to leave the conversation with a better understanding of each other and the different perspectives that make up a community. School is a great context for citizens to acquire important dialogic skills. Cannabis legalization provides interesting opportunities to practice and hone these skills. “Turning to One Another” is a insightful poem by Margaret Wheatley about the power of talking with each other and creating social changes. This lesson uses the poem to explore different aspects of dialogue and its significance in the context of shifting policies regarding cannabis.
Subject
English Language Arts
Keywords
iMinds
drug literacy
drug education
cannabis use
dialogue
URLs
http://www.iminds.ca
Learning Standards
Big ideas: Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world. People understand text differently depending on their worldviews and perspectives Questioning what we hear, read, and view contributes to our ability to be educated and engaged citizens Competencies: Think critically, creatively, and reflectively to explore ideas within, between, and beyond texts Recognize and identify the role of personal, social, and cultural contexts, values, and perspectives in texts Construct meaningful personal connections between self, text, and world Respond to text in personal, creative, and critical ways Exchange ideas and viewpoints to build shared understanding and extend thinking Use and experiment with oral storytelling processes
Duration
30-60 minutes with potential for more
Language
English
Date Created
Oct 29, 2018
0 recommendations   27 downloads

Cannabis: Stories, Questions and Life

Resource Type
Activity
Lesson Plan
Grade Level
8
9
Submitted By
Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research - 3 months ago
Description
This lesson uses Deborah Ellis’s short story “Thr…
Resource Type
Activity
Lesson Plan
Grade Level
8
9
Submitted By
Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research - 3 months ago
Description
This lesson uses Deborah Ellis’s short story “Through the Woods” as a catalyst for conversation around questions that are useful in examining the impact of cannabis use and regulation on individuals and relationships. “Through the Woods” is about a day in the life of Matthew, a 14-year-old boy who buys cannabis at school to take to his ailing grandmother who raised him until she became too sick to care for him. The story is ripe with easy-to-see themes that young people are sure to question naturally and/or identify with (e.g., stereotypes about cannabis dealers, users and non-users; risks and rewards of selling/buying/using cannabis; and reasons for using). As such, the story can be used to help students develop their skills in asking good questions as they interact with a story and its characters in more complex ways. This lesson aims to deepen students’ understanding of relationships between peers, family members and others as well as the complex nature of human drug use.
Subject
English Language Arts
Keywords
iMinds
drug literacy
drug education
cannabis use
cannabis
URLs
http://www.iminds.ca
Learning Standards
English Language Arts 8/9 Big ideas: Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world Questioning what we hear, read, and view contributes to our ability to be educated and engaged citizens Access information and ideas for diverse purposes and from a variety of sources and evaluate their relevance, accuracy, and reliability Apply appropriate strategies to comprehend written, oral, and visual texts, guide inquiry, and extend thinking Think critically, creatively, and reflectively to explore ideas within, between, and beyond texts Recognize and identify the role of personal, social, and cultural contexts, values, and perspectives in texts Recognize how language constructs personal, social, and cultural identity Construct meaningful personal connections between self, text, and world Respond to text in personal, creative, and critical ways Recognize how literary elements, techniques, and devices enhance and shape meaning Exchange ideas and viewpoints to build shared understanding and extend thinking Use writing and design processes to plan, develop, and create engaging and meaningful literary and informational texts for a variety of purposes and audiences Assess and refine texts to improve their clarity, effectiveness, and impact according to purpose, audience, and message Transform ideas and information to create original texts
Duration
30-60 minutes with potential for more
Language
English
Date Created
Oct 29, 2018
0 recommendations   209 downloads

Deal Maker or Deal Breaker

Resource Type
Lesson Plan
Worksheet
Grade Level
9
Submitted By
Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research - one year ago
Description
Alcohol was a part of the North American fur trad…
Resource Type
Lesson Plan
Worksheet
Grade Level
9
Submitted By
Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research - one year ago
Description
Alcohol was a part of the North American fur trade from the beginning, and many traders viewed it as a crucial ingredient in business success. For example, in 1764, a group of New York merchants petitioned the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to change regulations banning fur traders from using alcohol in their commerce. They argued “when the vent of liquors is allow’d amongst them, it spurs them on to an unwaried application in hunting in order to supply the trading places with furs and skins in exchange for liquors.”1 But not everyone who engaged in the fur trade saw it that way. This excerpt from a memoir by a Moravian missionary living in 18th century America gives us a glimpse into the reasons one Aboriginal man chose to deal with traders who did not use alcohol in their negotiations.
Subject
Social Studies
Keywords
iMinds
drug use
substance use
alcohol
north american fur trade
drug literacy
substance use education
substance use literacy
URLs
www.iminds.ca
Learning Standards
First Peoples’ principles of learning • Learning ultimately supports the well-being of the self, the family, the community, the land, the spirits, and the ancestors • Learning is holistic, reflexive, reflective, experiential, and relational (focused on connectedness, on reciprocal relationships, and a sense of place) • Learning involves recognizing the consequences of one’s actions • Learning recognizes the role of indigenous knowledge • Learning is embedded in memory, history, and story • Learning requires exploration of one’s identity Social Studies 9 Big ideas • Disparities in power alter the balance of relationships between individuals and between societies • Collective identity is constructed and can change over time Competencies • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to: ask questions; gather, interpret and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions • Assess the significance of people, places, events and developments, and compare varying perspectives on their historical significance at particular times and places and from group to group • Assess the justification for competing historical accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources and adequacy of evidence • Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions and development • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues and events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews and beliefs
Duration
30-60 minutes
Language
English
Date Created
May 18, 2017
0 recommendations   11 downloads

Drugs and relationships in “Perks of Being a Wallflower”

Resource Type
Activity
Lesson Plan
Grade Level
11
Submitted By
Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research - 3 months ago
Description
The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a novel by Ste…
Resource Type
Activity
Lesson Plan
Grade Level
11
Submitted By
Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research - 3 months ago
Description
The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a novel by Stephen Chbosky (and was made into a hit movie in 2012). Perks is a year-long series of ‘Dear Friend’ letters, written by 15-year-old Charlie, to an anonymous older teen whom Charlie believes is non-judgemental and won’t be freaked out by his references to drugs, sex and mental health issues. Charlie’s letters reveal that he is sensitive and very bright, but is struggling with post- traumatic stress disorder and filled with deep sadness owing to the suicide of his only school friend. He’s also filled with rage but doesn’t know why until the end of the story (when a sexual encounter triggers a repressed memory of his being molested by his aunt, who herself was a victim of child molestation by a family member). Perks provides various avenues for meaningful conversations around drug use, sexuality and wellbeing as well as dealing with mental health issues.
Subject
English Language Arts
Keywords
iMinds
drug literacy
drug education
cannabis
cannabis use
URLs
http://www.iminds.ca
Learning Standards
English Language Arts 11 – Composition Big ideas: The exploration of text and story deepens our understanding of diverse, complex ideas about identity, others, and the world People understand text differently depending on their worldviews and perspectives Texts are socially, culturally, geographically, and historically constructed Language shapes ideas and influences others Questioning what we hear, read, and view contributes to our ability to be educated and engaged citizens People are empowered by being able to communicate effectively Engagement with writing processes can support creativity and enhance clarity of e